• Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 18 days ago
    Just seen the total chaos being caused at five different locations by Insulate Britain. I have no other word for these people.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 29 days ago
    Just a quickie but is it worth my getting it again at the new reduced price of £12.47? Keep reducing it as I haven't renewed ....
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 1 month ago
    I bought a teak unit which is in very nice condition, very clean and suits the vibes of this odd place. Now on wheels courtesy of my neighbour so have seen it up-side down and no damp or anything there. I can only think it has been sitting in a garage for years unused. Problem is I just cannot get rid of the musty smell when I open the drawers. I've sprayed the drawers all over with Pledge, wiped down with Lavender essence and had in the sunshine outside for a day. I'm not a fan of air freshener or plug-ins. Had it a week now and the smell is still overpowering to me (though neighbour says he can't smell it). Any suggestions, please, as I'm not sure I can live with it!
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 1 month ago
    Just telephoned surgery for flu jab, knew they were only taking names as short of it and both neighbours have appointments booked and the lady said I've put you on the list, we will get in touch with you. I asked how they did that and she said well, how did they get in touch with you last time - I said, you didn't, that's why I'm ringing. OK, we will send you a text. My response, I don't have a mobile. Silence, OK, well I'm sure someone will get in touch with you, I've taken your name, Goodbye.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 2 months ago
    Taken from RAC Newsletter "Money-grab" - Sadiq Khan plans to increase London’s red route fines to £160 PA Images 6th Aug 2021 ShareFacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail Drivers could soon have to part with even more cash after Transport for London (TfL) launched a consultation on hiking the maximum fine on the capital’s red routes by £30. This follows an announcement last week that the increased Congestion Charge of £15 – at first thought to be temporary – will remain in place. RAC head of roads policy Nicholas Lyes condemned the recent move, labelling it a “money-grab” and expressing concerns that Mayor of London Sadiq Khan is “waging a war on drivers and businesses that rely on their vehicles”. An increase in fines for red route offences – along with others such as blocking yellow box junctions, breaking parking rules, performing illegal turns and driving in bus lanes – would mean motorists forking out a maximum penalty charge notice (PCN) of £160, up from £130. Red routes are London’s most important roads. Although they only make up 5% of the total road length, they carry more than 30% of the capital’s traffic. In a statement, TfL said: “Fines would be reduced to £80 if paid within 14 days. All income from PCNs is re-invested by TfL, to cover the cost of enforcement and schemes to reduce road danger.” The public consultation – launched on TfL’s website – will collate people’s opinions on the PCN changes via a survey until 19 September 2021. If the increase in fines goes ahead it will be the first rise in 10 years, which TfL says would be “in line with inflation”. It also says increasing fine amounts for offences such as illegal parking will deter motorists from breaking rules and therefore prevent the obstruction of “vital deliveries and collections”, as well as reduce delays for buses and emergency services. Siwan Hayward, TfL’s director of compliance and policing, said: “London’s network of red routes plays a vital role in keeping people moving across the capital and it’s really important that everybody follows the rules that are in place to keep roads clear and people safe. “We’d much rather people follow the rules than fine them, and the proposed increase in fine is intended to increase compliance with the rules and make streets safer, cleaner and less congested for everyone. ‘I’d urge people to have their say on these proposals and we welcome all feedback on our plans.”
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 2 months ago
    High-Risk Payment Gateway perfect solution you need - WebPays Struggling in getting a payment processing solution for your business, don’t worry. You have come to the right place. WebPays offers High-Risk Payment Gateway an exact solution that (…more) Comment Reply Share Follow
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 2 months ago
    WebPays WebPays @WebPays12 Santpoort-Noord Netherlands Joined 1 months ago WebPays is a professionally managed payment gateway provider based in UK, which offers a huge assortment of credit card, eCheck and ACH payment processing Services worldwide. To get more information about our services, Visit us:- https://webpays.com/ 0 Friends 3 Posts 0 Comments 0 Reactions 3 Points Accept Friend Request Send Message Recent Public Posts Activity WebPays 1 WebPays @WebPays12 Santpoort-Noord (Netherlands) - 1 hour agoHigh-Risk Payment Gateway perfect solution you need - WebPays Struggling in getting a payment processing solution for your business, don’t worry. You have come to the right place. WebPays offers High-Risk Payment Gateway an exact solution that (…more) Comment Reply Share Follow Local WebPays 1 WebPays @WebPays12 Santpoort-Noord (Netherlands) - 26 days agoGaming Merchant Account: Lets you pay better The exponential rise of the gaming industry comes along few challenges as well, to name a few there are legal restrictions, changing technology, high cash-back, and online gaming fra (…more) Comment Reply Share Follow Local WebPays 1 WebPays @WebPays12 Santpoort-Noord (Netherlands) - 1 month agoHigh-Risk Payment Gateway - High Risk Merchant Account UK Get the Best High Risk Payment Gateway with 2D Payment Gateway in the UK. info@webpays.com | ach, casino, retail, fantasy, High-risk, travel. To get more information about our services, Visit us:- webpays.com/ High Risk Merchant Account UK - 2D Payment Gateway Get the Best High Risk Merchant Account with 2D Payment Gateway in United Kingdom. info@webpays.com | Travel, CBD, Clothing, IPTV, Offshore,.. WebPays - High Risk Merchant Account UK Comment Reply Share Follow Local
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 2 months ago
    Have just been listening to Radio 4Extra programme on Gilbert Harding - 20 Questions - also an indepth interviews which I just caught the end of - a blast from the past indeed. Still on if you are interested.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 2 months ago
    Seven-in-10 drivers would like lower motorway speed limits in wet weather 31st Jul 2021 ShareFacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail Nearly three-quarters of drivers (72%) would like to see the standard 70mph speed limit on motorways reduced in wet weather to improve road safety and encourage better driving habits, RAC research has found.1 Of 2,100 drivers surveyed, a third (33%) said the limit should be reduced to 60mph in the wet, while 7% think it should be cut to 65mph. Seventeen per cent of drivers would like an even lower limit of 55mph or even 50mph, while 14% would like to see the limit cut but aren’t sure by how much. The RAC understands France is currently the only country in Europe to have speed limits that are reduced during inclement weather, with the 130km/h (80mph) limit reduced to 110km/h (68mph – a reduction of around 12mph). While there are significantly more motorway fatalities in France,2 806 people were still killed or seriously injured on motorways in Great Britain in 2019, with around a 30% of these casualties (246) occurring when the road surface was damp, wet or flooded – a figure higher than four years earlier (208).3 Official figures also show that wet roads and drivers travelling too fast for the conditions were respectively the cause of some 259 and 242 motorway collisions in 2018.4 Of the reasons given by drivers who advocate lower motorway speed limits in the wet, 78% said they felt lower limits would encourage some drivers to slow down, while 72% believed it might save lives, so is worth trying. Two-thirds (65%) said slower speeds might improve visibility with less spray from moving vehicles, and half (53%) felt it would reduce overall vehicle speeds, even if some people ignored the lower limit. Among the fifth of drivers (21%) who are against the idea of a lower motorway speed limit in bad weather, a majority said it was because most drivers already adjust their speed to the conditions (54%), or because there would be difficulty in defining when the new limit should apply (60%) – for instance, whether it would apply whenever the road surface was damp, or only while rain was actually falling. Four-in-10 (42%) said many drivers choose to ignore existing speed limits anyway and a similar proportion (41%) thought drivers wouldn’t obey a lower motorway limit. When asked whether a lower speed limit in the wet should be posted on stretches of motorway that already feature variable speed limit signage, including smart motorways, 73% of drivers were in favour, with 15% against the idea and 11% unsure. Advice for driving in heavy rain and floods Motorway cameras - what you need to know What is aquaplaning and how to avoid it RAC data insight spokesman Rod Dennis said: “Statistically, the UK has some of the safest motorways in Europe but it’s also the case that there hasn’t been a reduction in casualties of all severities on these roads since 2012, so perhaps there’s an argument for looking at different measures to help bring the number of casualties down. “Overall, our research suggests drivers are broadly supportive of lower motorway speed limits in wet conditions, as is already the case across the Channel in France. And while most drivers already adjust their speed when the weather turns unpleasant, figures show that ‘driving too fast for the conditions’ and ‘slippery roads’ are still among the top 10 reasons for motorway collisions and contribute to significant numbers of serious injuries and even deaths every year.4 “The overall success of any scheme would of course depend on sufficient numbers of motorists reducing their speed, but even just a proportion reducing their speed in the wet would be likely to improve the safety of the UK’s motorways. “There would also be a number of practical hurdles to be overcome such as deciding what that lower limit would be, updating the Highway Code and fitting roadside signage to inform drivers of the new limits. “Finally, it’s worth remembering that an increasing number of stretches of motorway no longer have permanent 70mph limits, as all smart motorways feature speed limits which are automatically adjusted to ease congestion based on traffic flow. "With digital signs now so commonplace, arguably the means exist to conduct a trial to see whether there are safety benefits of setting different speed limits in inclement weather.” Highway Code Rule 227 states that stopping distances in wet weather are at least double those required for stopping on dry roads. This means the typical stopping distance at 70mph in dry conditions of 96 metres (315 feet) is extended to at least 192 metres (630 feet) in the wet, the equivalent of 48 car lengths. For more information, see this page on the RAC website. Serious casualties on Great Britain’s motorways – when the road surface is damp, wet or over 3cm flooded 2016 2017 2018 2019 Average Killed 34 18 39 28 30 Seriously injured 220 185 199 218 206 Total 254 203 238 246 235 Snow, frost and ice excluded 1. Research conducted among 2,100 UK drivers who are members of the RAC Driver Opinion Panel. Figures are weighted to be nationally representative 2. Source: Office of Rail and Road, ‘Benchmarking Highways England: 2020 Progress Report’, figure 2.16: www.orr.gov.uk/sites/default/files/2021-02/benchmarking-highways-england-2020-progress-report.pdf 3. Source: Department for Transport, https://roadtraffic.dft.gov.uk/custom-downloads/road-accidents/reports/d3be5751-f829-484b-8bc8-0f858a471c61
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 2 months ago
    Pedestrians and cyclists given right of way in new Highway Code Pedestrians and cyclists given right of way in new Highway Code 30th Jul 2021 ShareFacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail Road users on foot and bike are to gain greater priority over cars at junctions and crossings due to new Highway Code changes, the Department for Transport (DfT) has announced. Currently, drivers are only required to give way when someone steps onto a crossing, while pedestrians are told they shouldn’t start to cross until vehicles on the road have stopped. The new rules – due to be published this autumn – will strengthen right of way for pedestrians on pavements and when crossing, or waiting to cross, the road. The updated Code will also give cyclists priority at junctions when travelling straight ahead, as well as issue guidance on safe passing distances and speeds. Plus, a “hierarchy of road users” will ensure the more high-risk modes of transport have the greatest responsibility to reduce the danger they pose to others. This move ­– which comes as part of the government’s new £338 million fund to boost cycling and walking ­ – intends to help accommodate and maintain the increase in active travel during the pandemic. Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said: “Millions of us have found over the past year how cycling and walking are great ways to stay fit, ease congestion on the roads and do your bit for the environment. “As we build back greener from the pandemic, we’re determined to keep that trend going by making active travel easier and safer for everyone.” He added that the funding package will enable more people to make “sustainable travel choices” that make our “air cleaner and cities greener”. The investment will also be used for infrastructure upgrades, including hundreds of miles of high-quality cycle lanes, as well as walking schemes. A guide to overtaking safely on the road 15 simple things you can do as a driver that could save a life Road crossings – what’s the difference between zebra, pelican, puffin and toucan crossings? RAC head of roads policy, Nicholas Lyes said: “These proposals should make cycling and walking safer, and this is to be welcomed. A concerted effort must now be made to communicate the changes to drivers because as we know, many do not read the Highway Code for long periods after passing their test. “Ultimately, the aim should be to ensure that everyone using the roads understands the new rules, because any confusion is likely to lead to avoidable collisions.” The updated Highway Code will affect England, Scotland, and Wales, while Northern Ireland has its own version.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 2 months ago
    I'm trying to remove all the walked-in emulsion that has been on the wood flooring under carpets. One room and hall already been done by a plumber who has gone on to pastures new and I've been trying without success. So far I've used steel wool with white spirit, sandpaper and white spirit, sander, very hot flannel and scraper and achieved nothing. I've tried oiling to see if it will darken but not happening. Sanding has driven the emulsion into the cracks, I think. Every room covered by carpet is the same, how anyone can be so idle as to walk paint through the whole ground floor is beyond me. Believe the woodblock is original l960s. Not looking for perfection but would rather not put another carpet over it.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 2 months ago
    Something beginning with N C
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 3 months ago
    buying Electric car leasing explained – EV financing vs buying 25th May 2021 ShareFacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail Leasing an electric car - the costs Introduction More than 90 percent of new cars are bought on finance, according to the latest Finance & Leasing Association statistics. Why such a big share? The benefits of leasing include fixed monthly repayments, no concerns about depreciation and the flexibility to switch to a new car at the end of the contract. Within this market, electric car leasing is growing in popularity, with many buyers using it as a way to see if they can live with an EV on a daily basis. This is an important consideration as we head towards the 2030 ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars. For reasons we’ll outline here, leasing an electric car can be much more appealing than other finance options or buying outright. Electric cars can be expensive to buy, but most vehicles should be well within reach on EV finance. Take the MG ZS Hatchback as an example. Car Leasing Buying MG MOTOR UK ZS HATCHBACK (petrol) £248.28 per month £18,000 MG MOTOR UK ZS ELECTRIC HATCHBACK (electric) £251.99 per month From £26,000 with plug-in grant Comparison on MG MOTOR UK ZS HATCHBACK 1.0T GDi Excite 5dr DCT (source) vs MG MOTOR UK ZS ELECTRIC HATCHBACK 105kW Exclusive EV 45kWh 5dr Auto (source) The electric MG ZS Electric looks expensive on paper, with a starting price of around £26,000. That’s £10,000 more than the entry-level petrol equivalent MG MOTOR UK ZS HATCHBACK 1.0T GDi Excite 5dr DCT with a 1-litre petrol engine. Leasing closes the gap between the two cars, however, with Nationwide Vehicle Contracts quoting a price of around £200 a month for the Corsa SE petrol and £250 for the electric Corsa-e. This is based on a three-year contract, an initial rental of six months and 10,000 miles a year. Read on to discover why leasing rather than buying an electric car might be a better fit for you. Electric car financing Spreading the large cost of a new car makes perfect sense, but you have to decide which finance deal to choose. We’re focusing on three options: personal contract purchase (PCP), hire purchase (HP) and leasing. You’ll often see leasing referred to as personal contract hire (PCH), which is the consumer version of a business lease. PCP - personal contract purchase The basic premise of a PCP deal is that you only pay for the car’s predicted depreciation over the length of the contract. That’s the difference between the list price and the car’s expected value at the end of the agreement, typically up to four years. Most new cars lose around 40 percent of their value over the first three years. Say a new car costs £20,000 and is expected to be worth £12,000 after 36 months. The £8,000 difference is due in the form of a small deposit and fixed monthly repayments. At the end of the contract, you can pay the remaining £12,000 or simply hand the car back. HP - hire purchase Before the boom in popularity of PCP deals, hire purchase (HP) was the most common form of new car finance. An HP agreement simply involves spreading the cost of a new car over a fixed period, typically 12 months to five years. At the end of the contract, the car is yours, with nothing more to pay. However, if you are considering an EV then HP might not be the best option for you. The rate of development in the field of battery technology is such that you could find that your EV is slightly outdated and outmoded by the end of the contract. This will make it more difficult to upgrade to a new electric car, as your trade-in value will be reduced. Leasing Leasing is currently the most popular option for financing an electric car - and for good reason. It’s likely to be the most affordable form of EV finance, not least because you’re essentially renting the car from the leasing company. At the time of writing, it was possible to lease an electric car for less than £200 a month, with even the Nissan Leaf and Renault Zoe, two of the UK’s most popular EVs, available for around this price. NEW! Electric car leasing deals NEW! Electric car leasing deals The easy way to go electric. Get all the benefits of a brand new car, without the hassle of owning it. Find your brand new electric car today! Find a car The pros and cons of leasing an electric car electric-car-leasing-vs-buying Pros Rate of EV development The rate of development in the electric car industry is extraordinarily high. Consider the likely range of a typical electric car, which has increased from around 100 miles a decade ago to 200-250 miles in 2021, with 300 miles likely from some models. Bigger choice of models There’s also a greater choice of EVs, including small cars designed for inner-city commuting, SUVs that are perfect for family life and sports cars with the performance to rival a supercar. Even more EVs will hit the market over the next couple of years, so a short-term lease gives you the flexibility to upgrade, rather than committing to what could become an outdated model. Depreciation costs As previously mentioned, EV technology is rapidly evolving, with battery capacity and range increasing across new models. It's a bit like having the latest mobile phone, whereby the next generation is always just around the corner. That's why the calculated depreciation on EVs can be so much higher than they might be on a petrol or diesel vehicle, and why you might want to upgrade your EV when new models with better battery range become available. If you buy your EV outright, there is a high risk of the value reducing within a year or 2 of it's life. That’s why leasing offers a more cost-effective way of driving a brand new EV, as the depreciation risk is with the leasing provider and not you. With shorter term leasing contracts, you can upgrade your EV every 2-3 years, meaning you get all the benefits of driving the latest models, without taking on the risk of vehicle depreciation. Battery condition Battery degradation is a common concern. A 2020 report found that, on average, you can expect an EV with a range of 188 miles to drop to 173 miles after six years. Say you travel 188 miles a week, that’s a loss of 780 miles a year. Another thing you don’t have to worry about when leasing an EV. Driving technology advancement Then there’s the rate at which technology is improving, not just in terms of battery capacity, but in the car’s smartphone connectivity, safety features and entertainment. Although you can already charge an EV with a typical 60kWh battery in around 8 hours using a 7kWh home charger, faster charging times, longer range estimates and enhanced user experiences are all likely within the next few years, making leasing an EV preferable to committing to a lengthy PCP or HP deal. Service and maintenance included With leasing, some providers give you the option to add on a service and maintenance package, which is spread across the length of the contract. Maintenance packages can include all scheduled maintenance such as MOT, servicing and tyre replacement. Breakdown and roadside assistance can also be included. The good news is, with fewer moving parts and no oil to top up, maintaining an EV is much simpler than a traditional petrol or diesel car, and you should make big savings. You should also find that breakdown cover is included as part of the manufacturer’s warranty. Cons Mileage penalties At the beginning of your contract you can agree to the set amount of miles you travel per year which will reflect in your monthly rental payment, however there are penalties at the end of your contract for going over the agreed mileage limit. You’ll be charged a price in pence for every mile over the mileage cap, so make sure you work this out as accurately as you can, or set a higher limit from the outset to ensure you are covered against extra charges. Damage excess charges Although you don’t own the car, you are expected to look after the lease car as if you do. If you don’t add on a maintenance package, it will be your responsibility to ensure the vehicle is fully maintained on an annual basis, as well as repair any damage caused during the life of the contract that is considered beyond reasonable wear and tear. Any damage or failure to service the vehicle will result in end of contract charges, which can vary in cost depending on the type of damage. Battery rental In rare cases, the leasing fee doesn’t include the battery rental. You’ll find this on older versions of the Renault Zoe, so check with the finance company before signing the lease agreement. Leasing an electric car - the costs The difference between leasing a petrol or electric version of the MG MOTOR UK ZS HATCHBACK can be very little, but what about a more expensive EV? Using the same search criteria (personal lease, three years, initial rental six months, 10,000 miles per annum), for a larger SUV such as the Kia e-Niro could cost between £325 and £450 a month. A standard Kia Niro is likely to cost between £275 and £350 a month. Yes, the EV is more expensive, but you’ll benefit from lower running costs, significant tax advantages and not to mention the environmental impact of running a zero emissions vehicle. For company car drivers, the benefit-in-kind (BIK) tax rate for electric vehicles is just 1%. For some context, with CO2 emissions of 110g/km, even the basic Kia Picanto attracts a BIK rate of 27%. That means a high-end electric car will cost less in company car tax than a tiny city petrol car. Other cost advantages include exemption from the London Congestion Charge and Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) fee, along with free parking (and charging) in selected London boroughs and other UK towns and cities. Supermarkets are also supporting the take-up on electric cars, with free EV charging pays popping up across their larger superstores, so you charge whilst you shop! RAC electric car leasing offers^ You can now lease an electric car with the RAC in partnership with Hitachi Capital Vehicle Solutions. You can choose both the length of your leasing agreement and how much the initial rental payment is – usually the equivalent of one, three, six or 12 months’ rental payments. The prices below are based on a three-year agreement – 10,000 miles per year – with an initial payment of six months’ rental followed by 35 monthly payments. Car make and model Rental Nissan Leaf Hatchback 110kw N-Connecta 40kWh 5dr Auto £227.99 Vauxhall Corsa-e 100kW SRi Nav Premium 50kWh 5dr Auto (7.4kwch) £227.99 Hyundai Kona Electric Hatchback 100Kw Premium 39kWh 5dr Auto £299.99 Hyundai Kona Electric Hatchback 150kW Premium 64kWh 5dr Auto £311.99 Peugeot e-2008 Electric Estate 100kw GT Premium 50kwh 5dr Auto £347.99 Mercedes EQA AMG Line £558.00 Mercedes-Benz EQC AMG Line £647.99 Mercedes EQC AMG Line Premium £707.99 Check out our full range of extremely competitive electric car leasing deals. Other types of electric car finance If you’ve decided that leasing isn’t for you, there are a number of other electric car finance options to choose from. A short PCP deal is likely to be the most affordable alternative to leasing, but you could find that you’re limited to the smallest EVs on the market. Like a leasing contract, you’re restricted to a mileage cap and you must service and maintain the car to strict standards. A personal loan or HP agreement gives you greater flexibility, but you’re exposed to the spectre of depreciation and negative equity. Conclusion The benefits of leasing are plentiful: lower monthly payments, greater flexibility and a clear handle on your monthly outgoings. That said, leasing isn’t for everyone, so be sure to check out RAC Cars to look at the best options for you. It’s important to do your homework before signing a leasing agreement and be sure to shop around for a great deal. There’s never been a better time to lease a new electric car! ^Correct at time of issuing
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 3 months ago
    I have tried 3 times now to clap or heart different posts and nothing happens? Any body else having same trouble -I am on Fire tablet.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 3 months ago
    Phishing warning: fake Sainsbury’s marketing survey email Facebook Twitter Reddit Email 28 Sainsbury’s has confirmed that an email promising £90 for taking part in a ‘marketing survey’ has nothing to do with it. Here’s what the email looks like. We’re all used to seeing slick marketing from brands. Many feature recognisable logos and familiar brand colours to promote their offers across emails, social media, TV adverts… the list goes on. But Sainsbury’s has confirmed that this ‘marketing survey’ email and the site it takes you through to have nothing to do with the supermarket. The survey and its offers of free ‘rewards’ are fake, and eventually encourage you to part with sensitive personal information. Here’s what the email looks like: Why the hassle of a fake survey? Phishing attempts like this are becoming more sophisticated: fraudsters impersonating these companies know that posing as a well-known brand may not be enough to get someone to part with sensitive information, so are using more thorough tactics to gain your trust. Completing the fake survey will take you through to another page dressed in Sainsbury’s branding that encourages you to ‘claim’ a reward. An ‘offer expires’ countdown is another sign that the site is attempting to rush you into making a decision. Continuing to follow these links eventually takes you to a page encouraging you to enter sensitive information, such as your name, address and email, all of which could then be used by the people behind these fake emails. A Sainsbury’s spokesperson said: “Customers should always be mindful of phishing scams. This message is not from Sainsbury’s and we are advising customers to delete it” Have you spotted fake ‘marketing’ emails? In April, a similar ‘loyalty program’ email promising prizes and purporting to have been sent from Dyson was confirmed to be a fake. Have you noticed an increase in these types of tactics?
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 4 months ago
    Maybe already report but have just received a Pm and could only read the last few words (on Fire tablet, can't speak for desktop). Anyone else having this problem?
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 4 months ago
    About 60% of the posts I click on, not all, just go to the opening posts so then have to scroll down to the end. As some posts are getting very long, it can be very frustrating - has been going on for some days (probably since you changed to the new layout). Any chance of reverting to going straight to the post I clicked on, please.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 4 months ago
    Police chief admits he’d rather his family didn’t use smart motorways Police chief admits he’d rather his family didn’t use smart motorways PA Images 21st May 2021 ShareFacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail A high-ranking police officer is among a group of motoring experts to tell MPs they’d rather see their loved ones drive on roads with hard shoulders than so-called smart motorways. The Transport Select Committee asked a group of industry leaders – including a representative from the RAC – whether they’d feel more comfortable with relatives using a ‘controlled’ motorway with a hard shoulder or an 'all lane running' smart motorway with no hard shoulder and all the promised safety improvements. Chris Todd, assistant chief constable at West Midlands Police, said 'if pushed', he would choose for his relatives to have the 'additional' safety of a continuous hard shoulder. The chief constable said: “In the way it was described, the all-lanes running (motorway) with ERAs (emergency refuge areas) and with the SVD (stopped vehicle detection) system in place, I would have a high level of confidence. “But if I was pushed for an overall or binary decision, I would probably opt for the controlled motorway in terms of the additional facilities that it provides from a policing perspective.” This means that although he'd be confident on a smart motorway without a hard shoulder if it had all the planned safety improvements active, he'd still prefer a motorway with a full hard shoulder. RAC head of policy Nicholas Lyes said he would also favour the controlled motorway with a hard shoulder option, but with 'additional technology'. Speaking on the removal of the hard shoulder, Mr Lyes added: “We fundamentally changed what was needed to be done in the event of a breakdown because for decades we have had a hard shoulder. “Then suddenly you take the hard shoulder out and there is a completely different way of having to deal with an emergency breakdown. It is a bit like changing the emergency landing procedures of an aeroplane and not telling the pilot what to do.” On stretches of smart motorway the hard shoulder is either permanently or temporarily used as a live running lane to improve traffic flow. But drivers run the risk of being left stranded if they break down or have an accident too far from a junction or an SOS area. Here, their safety is dependent on both the ‘red X’ being activated to close the lane, and also on drivers obeying the warning signs by changing lanes. The Government has been under pressure to either scrap 'all lane running' smart motorways or drastically improve their safety following a number of deaths that have occurred on them. South Yorkshire Police is currently assessing whether Highways England is criminally responsible for the deaths of two men on the M1. Last year, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps responded to a rise in smart motorway safety concerns with an 18-point action plan. In April, the Government announced no new 'all lane running' smart motorways will be opened without radar camera technology to detect stopped or broken-down vehicles quickly. It promised plans for all existing smart motorways to have the technology installed will be brought forward by six months to September next year. Smart motorways – what are they and how do you use them? What to do if your car breaks down? The Highway Code – Common UK road signs and what they mean Answering the committee, Mr Todd, who also oversees the force’s motorway response patrols, said: “In the way it was described, the all-lanes running (motorway) with ERAs (emergency refuge areas) and with the SVD (stopped vehicle detection) system in place, I would have a high level of confidence. “But if I was pushed for an overall or binary decision, I would probably opt for the controlled motorway in terms of the additional facilities that it provides from a policing perspective.” He also stated on record that it’s harder for police to reach crash victims when all smart motorway lanes are in use. In his response to the committee’s key question, RAC head of policy Nicholas Lyes said: “I think to answer the question it would be a controlled motorway with a hard shoulder and with additional safety technology." In March, Highways England launched a new campaign ‘Go Left’ to enhance drivers’ confidence about what to do in the event of a breakdown on a motorway or major A-road, with or without a hard shoulder.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 4 months ago
    Dognappers beware: we’re on your tail By LORRAINE FISHER PUBLISHED: 00:02, 6 June 2021 | UPDATED: 00:02, 6 June 2021 e-mail 1 View comments A missing poster for Ted the sprocker spaniel, whose owner was attacked by thugs +4 A missing poster for Ted the sprocker spaniel, whose owner was attacked by thugs With rising demand driving up prices of puppies, thieves are resorting to violence to steal them, leaving families heartbroken. Lorraine Fisher talks to the owners teaming up to stop the snatchers Walking her devoted dog through the countryside near her Wigan home should have been the most relaxing part of the day for Tracey Bilski. Instead, she was on tenterhooks every time Charlie, a ten-year-old cavachon (a cross between a bichon frise and a king charles cavalier), disappeared from view. Tracey, 51, a professional dog-walker, had listened to so many stories about dogs being stolen that she feared Charlie could be next. ‘I heard about a man being attacked in the local park by people trying to steal his dog,’ she says. ‘He needed hospital treatment. Thieves also broke into a nearby house and stole seven french bulldog puppies when the owners were out.’ In January a lurcher called Socks had been bundled into a car by three men, leaving her owner distraught. Because of her work, Tracey is acutely aware of the special place dogs hold in their owners’ hearts. She knows the heartbreak that accompanies the loss of a beloved companion – and if that loss is through theft, she adds, the pain can be unbearable. ‘Weeks and months searching, not knowing your dog’s fate and thinking it’s your fault for not keeping a closer watch. I can’t imagine anything worse.’ RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 2 Next My canine carer can even tell when I'm about to faint Sara Cox: 'I'd lost my mojo. I didn't know what I was doing' Harsh truths only widows know Have you ever experienced a time slip? Delta Goodrem: 'I had to learn to speak again' 'My daughter's been "stolen" from me. But I'm the one... Hayley Hasselhoff: 'It's tough when your dad's that guy from... SHARE THIS ARTICLE Share Yet it’s a nightmare that’s increasingly coming true for owners in the UK. Incidents of dog theft went up by a fifth in 2020, with an estimated 2,438 dogs – that’s equivalent to almost seven a day – reported stolen to the police, although charities think the overall figure is far higher. The number of dog owners soared in lockdown, with 2.2 million people acquiring animals in the first six months of the pandemic. As demand escalated, so too did the price – which has risen to average of £800 per animal, though many do cost thousands. The most popular breeds (and most valuable to thieves) are staffordshire bull terriers, english bulldogs, cavapoos (king charles cavaliers crossed with poodles), miniature dachshunds, cockapoos (cocker spaniels crossed with poodles) and french bulldogs. While some dog theft is opportunism, there are also organised gangs that steal to order or to supply puppy farms. Unneutered animals are particularly attractive as they can be used for breeding – often kept in horrific conditions in filthy cages. Tracey Bilski with her cavachon Charlie +4 Tracey Bilski with her cavachon Charlie While it’s UK law for all puppies over eight weeks to be microchipped, not all owners do this, and many puppies are stolen before they’re chipped. Savvy thieves also remove chips from older animals to hide their background from new families. Dogs have become such a valuable commodity that thieves will even use violence. In the past six months alone, a british bulldog puppy called Spot was stolen at knifepoint in Southeast London, a nine-week-old american bulldog called Cairo was snatched by three machete-wielding thugs in Glasgow and a sprocker spaniel called Ted was stolen after thieves punched his owner in the back and pushed him to the ground. Some owners have successfully fought back (though police don’t advise risking your safety). Student Ally Knight, 22, got two black eyes after fending off two men trying to steal her pug in Plymouth, while former amateur boxer James Cosens refused to hand over his collie pup Rosi despite being threatened with a knife. Northwest England, where Tracey lives, has become a dognapping hotspot, accounting for 15 per cent of reported thefts last year. The area’s large open spaces make walkers easy targets and many women are becoming too scared to venture out alone, she says. Realising something needed to be done, Tracey discovered DogHorn (doghorn.uk), a grassroots initiative created to tackle the crime at a community level. Anyone worried about dog theft in their area can set up a local group online. Members band together into a neighbourhood dog-watch and walk in groups, wearing hi-vis jackets and lanyards to let thieves know that they’re alert. According to DogHorn founder Nigel King, these acts can be a powerful deterrent. If dog thieves know local owners are primed, they think twice about striking. Nigel, a 67-year-old former RAF pilot, launched the scheme last November after witnessing his friend’s distress at the loss of her springer spaniel Nora while on a walk near Druridge Bay, Northumberland. ‘She was one of four dogs being walked and the only one that disappeared,’ recalls Nigel, who has his own miniature schnauzer, Timber. ‘They’re very valuable gun dogs that always come when called – it’s for that reason we believe Nora was stolen. At first we hoped she’d just been lost – theft seemed too scary – but after four days of no sightings, we knew she’d been taken. We called the police but as we hadn’t witnessed a crime, there was nothing they could do.’ More than six months later, her owner is devastated. ‘Nora hasn’t been recovered and we don’t think she will be,’ Nigel says. Powerless to bring back his friend’s beloved companion, Nigel began wondering what he could do to help. ‘I was thinking, “What advice is there for someone who knows a thief is approaching?”’ he says. ‘It’s no good picking up the phone – by the time someone’s come to help, the thief’s a long way away. I realised the quickest way to gain assistance is through the use of sound. We came up with a loud whistle, normally used by football referees.’ DogHorn members are taught the morse code SOS distress signal (three short blows, three long, then three short). The theory is that the sound travels up to a kilometre, alerting other members in the vicinity to the problem. They can then come running to give support or be on the lookout for suspicious activity, logging descriptions of thieves or car number plates. The idea has clearly struck a chord with worried owners: since its inception, DogHorn has grown into a 10,000-strong force made up of 30 different groups all over the country. Anecdotally, it seems to be working, with no dog thefts reported in its areas of operation. DogHorn is something Lydia Rampin could have done with when her year-old cocker spaniel Lola was stolen in Buckinghamshire last March. Like most thefts, it happened in the blink of an eye. Lola was by Lydia’s side as she introduced her mother to a friend outside their house but, when she turned around, the dog was gone. ‘I instantly panicked because I knew she’d never have run off,’ says the 26-year-old physiotherapist. ‘She never leaves my side and she’s so well-trained she always comes when called. I looked for five minutes then called the police – but with nothing to go on, there was little they could do.’ The next few weeks were spent searching for Lola, following up every potential sighting, but with no luck. ‘It took over my life – every waking second was about Lola. She was my first dog, I was really proud of her and all my friends loved her. She’d been my constant companion. Now she’s gone and I miss her every moment of the day.’ Like many other owners in her position, after putting up posters locally and making appeals on social media, Lydia has suffered months of hoax calls from people claiming to know where Lola is – some even demanding money for her return. Given the suffering that dog theft causes, the penalties are too lenient, say campaigners. When Amazon driver Levi Pislea, 22, stole a miniature schnauzer (while delivering dog food), he was given a 12-month community order by magistrates in High Wycombe. In Dundee the Sheriff’s court fined Andrew Alexander, 35, just £250 for taking a pug puppy. Meanwhile, a gang of four that snatched 15 cavalier king charles spaniels from a breeder in Lincolnshire received suspended sentences. Doghorn founder Nigel King with Timber the schnauzer +4 Doghorn founder Nigel King with Timber the schnauzer To date the police have offered limited assistance, although that is slowly changing. Nottinghamshire police recently became the first force to appoint a specialist dog theft officer. ‘I have dogs,’ says chief inspector Amy Styles-Jones. ‘I understand the impact of dog theft and want to make a difference and reduce that heartache.’ And last month, the government announced a Pet Theft Taskforce to recommend new measures to deal with this increasingly common crime. Only a fifth of stolen dogs are reunited with their owners, but occasionally there is a happy ending. Last August, Katy-Ellen Stickley’s two-year-old springer spaniel Trigger was stolen from a ground-floor balcony at her home near Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire. ‘It was a hot summer’s evening and my partner Dean and I were sitting inside with the doors open. Trigger was lying on the balcony because he likes the sun on his face,’ says the 31-year-old. ‘Dean said he’d seen two men walk past with a pole. We live in a small village, where everyone knows everyone, but he didn’t know these two or what they were up to. ‘Trigger must have heard a noise because he got up and went out of view. A few minutes later one of my sons came into the room and asked, “Where’s Trigger?” I called him but he didn’t come. ‘We began panicking immediately – Dean started calling his name so loudly that neighbours came out to help us look. As we were frantically searching the streets, Dean saw the two men again and asked what they were doing with the pole. They said they’d gone fishing but there’s nowhere to do that round here so Dean took down the licence plate of their van. ‘We called the police and they noticed a chalk mark on our fence, which they think was made by the thieves on an earlier recce, so they would know which house to go back to. The police said they would have hooked Trigger out of the garden with the pole. They did trace the two men but they’d got rid of Trigger by then and there was no evidence.’ Weeks of agony followed. ‘It didn’t hit me for the first 48 hours as I was so busy searching for him,’ says Katy-Ellen. ‘But one night I sat down, saw Trigger wasn’t on the sofa and just cried. It was like having one of your children stolen.’ Her sons, George, 11, and Frankie, seven, were also badly affected. ‘Their teachers told me they had been crying at school.’ There was no sign of their dog until April when the family received a phone call. ‘It was Wembley police saying Trigger was sitting under one of their desks,’ says Katy-Ellen. ‘He’d been handed in to them because he’d been jumping into people’s cars. We’ve no idea what happened to him, but we suspect he was used for breeding because his paws and belly were stained with urine, which indicates he’d been kept in a cage.’ Trigger’s microchip had led to his family being traced but Katy-Ellen and Dean still weren’t convinced it was their pet until they drove to collect him. ‘He ran straight over to us and laid on his back for a belly rub,’ she says. ‘Even the police officers were crying – they said they had dealt with horrible dog thefts and rarely got to see a reunion.’ DogHorn’s members, meanwhile, hope that changes in the law – alongside an increase in their number – will prevent anyone having to go through what Katy-Ellen and Trigger endured. Until that time, they say, the dog thieves should be careful because the DogHorn community is watching… Katy-Ellen Stickley and family were reunited with their dog Trigger +4 Katy-Ellen Stickley and family were reunited with their dog Trigger Keep your canine safe DogLost, the UK’s biggest dog-rescue community, has the following advice ■ Don’t leave your dog locked in a car or van, or tied up outside a shop. ■ Never leave your dog in the garden on its own. ■ Keep good quality, up-to-date photographs in case your dog goes missing. Capture all angles and any distinguishing marks. ■ Make sure your dog is microchipped and that your details are registered and kept up-to-date. ■ Beware of social media – don’t post specifics of your dog’s location online. ■ Always keep your dog in sight and, if a stranger approaches, put it on a lead and walk near others. ■ Don’t let your children walk the dog alone. ■ Be vigilant, pay attention and don’t get distracted by your phone. ■ Always report attempted thefts and suspicious incidents to the police. How to see off scam callers In the past few months, more than 100 British families have been targeted by criminals demanding ransoms for missing dogs, says DogLost. Here’s what to do if someone contacts you claiming to have found your pet… Don’t ■ Transfer money to any bank or PayPal account. ■ Respond to texts requesting money transfers to Bitcoin wallets. ■ Meet the caller in person carrying cash.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 5 months ago
    I very much doubt there will be much sympathy but I am livid that I can no longer pay on line via my M & S credit card as they do not have a mobile phone number. Tried paying 3 times for my Co-op delivery and in the end had to put in my mobile number before they would accept the order, even though I had put in landline number ("Sorry, that doesn't look like a mobile No"). In the end, I had to pay the food order via my bank card which I prefer not to do on line ever. What right has any company to say that one has to have a mobile phone. I'm not even going to say rant over because it's not.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 5 months ago
    I'm going to try and return the new Acer Eclipse laptop I've just purchased but in case I'm unable to ...... No caps lock light so haven't a clue whether caps are on or off (passwords, etc). And the world's worst display of email notifications in washed-out grey. I've been in all possible display/colours/contrasts,etc. Can have yellow/purple/blue/green on black/pink/grey but not black on white. Returns states item must be unopened (Argos) and I obviously have.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 6 months ago
    Another one from the RAC newsletter (with permission to share) 31st Mar 2021 ShareFacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail Increased funding for highway maintenance isn’t enough to help local authorities in England and Wales reach target conditions, with more than £10 billion needed to get roads back in shape, a new Asphalt Industry Alliance (AIA) report reveals. Despite a 15% increase in highway maintenance budgets, partly due to Government funding to repair potholes and support active travel, budgets are still lower than they were two years ago and road conditions have not significantly improved, the Annual Local Authority Road Maintenance (ALARM) survey highlights. The RAC has also urged Scottish authorities to conduct “swift corrective maintenance” to damaged Highland roads in Scotland. This includes the popular tourist route the North Coast 500 which The Scotsman reports to have “big holes in sections” as well as “suspension-destroying” potholes on the trail. RAC spokesman Rod Dennis said: “This year, the colder winter we’ve had means potholes are likely to make driving some stretches of the route a lot less enjoyable, but they also risk causing expensive damage to vehicles. “Without some swift corrective maintenance it looks as though the arrival of spring could coincide with many more drivers running into problems, including on the NC500 itself.” A spokesperson for Highland Council said: “The recent severe weather between January and March has caused considerable damage to Highland roads. We have a process in place regarding potholes and defects, and all incidents that are reported are followed up.” Between October and December last year, RAC patrols attended more than 1,400 breakdowns in the UK where potholes were most likely to be the cause. Report a pothole and find out how to claim for damage How to check your tyre pressure | Video guide 20 ways to make your car last longer While there has been an increase in the number of potholes filled over the last 12 months – the equivalent of one every 19 seconds – the AIA states this shouldn’t necessarily be seen as a positive. AIA chair Rick Green welcomed the increase in funding but said “using it to repeatedly fill in potholes is essentially a failure as it does nothing to improve the resilience of the network”. The average frequency of road surfacing is now once every 68 years and it would take £10.24 billion over a decade to clear the backlog of maintenance on local roads in England and Wales. Mr Green called for a longer-term approach to local road funding, similar to the five-year commitment given to motorways and major A roads. This would allow local authority highway engineers to “plan ahead and implement a more proactive, sustainable and cost-effective whole life approach to maintaining the network”, he said. “This commitment is vital to the nation’s post-pandemic reset in which we will rely on our local road network to support recovery and underpin active travel and levelling-up goals.” Nicholas Lyes, RAC head of roads policy, said: “The AIA’s report lays bare the pressure on local authorities who are grappling with crumbling road surfaces. On the one hand additional money allows them to fix potholes but the inconsistent nature of this funding often means they focus on short-term quick fixes rather than preventing them from occurring in the first place. “Potholes are a nuisance and not only cause expensive vehicle damage but can also lead to serious injury or even worse. Without a long-term approach to local road maintenance funding, similar to what we already have for strategic roads, we face our roads remaining in a perpetually poor state. “The Government must now change tack and ring-fence a small proportion of existing fuel duty revenues over a five-year period so that local authorities are able to plan routine maintenance properly and get our local roads up to a fit and proper standard.”
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 6 months ago
    I have spent last 42 minutes waiting on phone for the surgery to enquire when I might be getting my second injection only to be told that they have no idea, it's out of their hands and to ring daily (even twice a day) to see if slot becomes available. Hearing of so many people who have had their second jab who had their first one later. Surgery have no idea if it's a location problem (site now only doing every other day) or vaccine problem. Twelve weeks up on Monday. When I rang last week was told that I should wait until I was contacted. Tomorrow is out as have a hospital appointment. Grrr!
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 6 months ago
    I'm debating (with myself) whether to get one of these. I've currently an Ercol Gina (swivel and recline) but the recline is stuck on the back position and the upholstery is now so hard it's like sitting on a rock. I'm not interested in recline anyway, just the swivel bit which I love. As previously mentioned, I'm of an age where I want a high seat and good back support but don't really want to go down the winged-fireside just yet. I've always thought Stressless were huge things stuck in a corner but I think you can now get small - and always seem to be in leather which I hate. Problem is they are not cheap (cheapest I've found is about £800 in sale to about £1,500) and I go through different chairs/sofas constantly (not an exaggeration, had two sofas since moving and neither was comfortable after a month or so or too bulky for little room). Would be grateful for any pros or cons - thanks.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 7 months ago
    Taken (with permission to share) from the RAC newletter - dated 5.5.21 So-called ‘smart’ motorways could soon be due a name change after the Transport Secretary branded the roads a misnomer. During an announcement in which he brought forward the deadline for new Stopped Vehicle Detection (SVD) technology, Grant Shapps shared his frustrations with the expansion scheme. He said: “I don't want to carry on with what we've seen of smart motorways, the system I've inherited... I wouldn't have gone about it like this, and I don't approve of the fact that emergency areas were being spaced way too far apart. “I've said they have to be ideally three-quarters of a mile apart, no more than a mile, and I've ordered Highways England to get on with it.” Despite the Transport Secretary’s request, nine projects with refuge areas between 1.04 and 1.39 miles apart were confirmed in November last year. 44 people have died on smart motorways over the last five years, and calls to reverse their construction are growing. Meera Naran, who has campaigned for safer smart motorways described the projects as ‘‘absolutely unacceptable’’. The senior lecturer lost her eight-year-old son Dev when an HGV collided with his grandfather’s car, which was stopped on a hard shoulder that was being used as a live lane on the M6 near Solihull. Reports show that there was a two-and-a-half-mile gap between emergency refuge areas at the scene of the accident. Mr Shapps told MPs that reversing work on smart motorways would mean acquiring land the equivalent of 700 Wembley stadium-sized football pitches, destroying swathes of Green Belt and buying up people's homes.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 8 months ago
    Not the right place to put this but the shutter on my very old Sony Cybershot has jammed so just making a noise when you click. Is there anyway of un-jamming this, would anyone know, please. I've tried the reset button. All is not lost as just bought the proceeding model on ebay (£9 incl.p&p - not yet received) in the hope that there is not too much difference (I do prefer the view finder). Would be nice if there was a way round the jammed shutter though.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 8 months ago
    Had an email from a friend who has lived in Cyprus for the past 10+ years, copying part of it here. From the word go, Cyprus has grabbed the bull by the horns and reacted very quickly to the pandemic with enforced lockdowns, restrictions and heavy fines for offenders. On a daily basis, I have to fill in and sign and date a government form depicting my reasons every time I am leaving the house. I also have to get an SMS text message from the government. I have to declare my home address and passport number, post code etc before I can leave my house. We are restricted to how many times I can go out in a 24 hour period. It was once a day but they have now extended it to two. I have been stopped by the police three times checking my paperwork. All restaurants tavernas etc are closed. It is annoying and disruptive but I live with it.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 9 months ago
    I found this interesting Intriguing. I have just searched for ‘Best Rate ISA’. The top results were 1. Moneysavingexpert 2. Comparethemarket 3. Moneysupermarket 4. Which 5. Moneyfacts All relevant and trustworthy websites I think which can give me more information. So why didnt I see any suspicious websites or ads? Must be because all searches I carry out are through DUCKDUCKGO.COM and NOT GOOGLE. Look, first and foremost Google is a TRACKING company not a search engine. Google trackers are lurking behind the scenes on 75% of the top million websites (and yes most likely Which.co.uk too) Even Facebook only has 25%! I found these interesting facts and a lot more on ‘spreadprivacy’. Search for it, but not through Google as goodness knows what it would show you. 0 Vote up |
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 9 months ago
    Another silly tip. I ordered some vinyl samples which came about 6" square and have been using since as little mug mats. Ages ago had some delivered with a bit left over and was fed up with moving the roll so today I had a bright idea and covered the metal shelves of a baker's rack with it (in the porch with plants on) and I'm delighted. Intend doing other shelving tomorrow - and all I needed was a pair of scissors (no men needed). Every thing now just needs a wipe over with a damp cloth. Would even work as place mats on the table. I'm smitten.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 9 months ago
    I hesitate to put this as I'm a definite non-cook (incapable) but tonight - to use stuff up from the fridge - I'm having a large naan bread spread with tomato puree, with sliced courgette, mushrooms, onion and tomatoes on top, bit of olive oil and then grated cheese. Could have added cooked chicken but I let the dog have that. I tend to put in a dish of tinfoil as it can melt down the sides. Pudding will probably be a glass of Baileys. Don't all rush.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 10 months ago
    Not sure this is worth putting up but never knew what to do with masks after I'd rinsed them through with soap and water. Then remembered I had a metal mug stand which is ideal for drip-drying over the sink and then in the warmth to dry. Job done.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 10 months ago
    This stopped recharging some while ago (have now a new one), tried again today but still doesn't happen. I've deregistered it via Amazon but I can't take it back to factory settings as it won't switch on. Is this best thing to soak in a bucket of water before I put in the electrical recycling bin, please or is that not necessary - thanks.
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  • Selsey @Selsey Hayes updated 12 months ago
    Without getting political in any way, I am really struggling to understand what's going on at the moment. On the one hand I read of people having trouble feeding their children and themselves, jobs are going left, right and centre and on the other hand, everywhere I go there are 'Sold' signs, skips and scaffolding. I'm getting very confused by it all.
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